Advancing Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights
 
STATE REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH PROFILE

Oklahoma

NATIONAL BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT

Despite the demonstrable importance and ubiquity of contraception, the truth is that ensuring that every pregnancy is wanted and planned is difficult, at both the individual and the societal levels. For the typical American woman to have two children, she will spend close to three years pregnant, postpartum or attempting to become pregnant, and about three decades—more than three-quarters of her reproductive life—trying to avoid pregnancy. Not all women, however, are successful: About half of all pregnancies in the United States each year—more than three million of them—are unintended. By age 45, more than half of all American women will have experienced an unintended pregnancy, and at 2008 rates about three in ten will have had an abortion. Nonetheless, contraceptive use can and does dramatically reduce women's odds of having an unintended pregnancy.

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

  • In 2013, there were 806,810 women of reproductive age (aged 13–44) in Oklahoma, 433,860 of whom were in need of contraceptive services and supplies. Of these:
    • AGE: 57,850 were under the age of 20 and 376,010 were aged 20–44.
    • INCOME: Among women aged 20–44, 75,580 were below 100% of the federal poverty level.
    • RACE/ETHNICITY: 270,710 were non-Hispanic white; 36,880 were non-Hispanic black; and 44,990 were Hispanic.
  • In 2013 , there were 253,630 women in Oklahoma in need of publicly supported contraceptive services and supplies. Of these, 57,850 were in need of publicly supported services because they were sexually active teenagers, and 195,770 because they had incomes below 250% of the federal poverty level.
  • In 2012–2013, 23% of women aged 15–44 in Oklahoma were uninsured, while 14% were enrolled in Medicaid.

For more information, see Contraceptive Needs and Services

PREGNANCIES, BIRTHS AND ABORTIONS

  • In 2011, there were 69,200 pregnancies to the 742,005 women of reproductive age (15-44) in Oklahoma; of those that did not result in miscarriages or stillbirths, 76% resulted in live births and 8% in induced abortions.
  • In 2010, 51% of pregnancies in Oklahoma were unintended. There were 36,000 unintended pregnancies to women in Oklahoma, producing an unintended pregnancy rate of 49 per 1,000 women of reproductive age.
  • Of all unintended pregnancies in Oklahoma in 2010, 68% resulted in live births and 17% resulted in induced abortions.
  • In 2010, 80.7% of unplanned births in Oklahoma were publicly funded, compared with 65.2% of all births and 52.2% of planned births.
  • Of the 34,700 publicly funded births in Oklahoma in 2010, 19,600 were unplanned.
  • Unintended pregnancies in Oklahoma accounted for $331.0 million in public costs in 2010, including $254.0 million in federal costs and $77.0 million in state costs.
  • In 2011, 5,860 women obtained abortions in Oklahoma, producing a rate of 7.9 abortions per 1,000 women of reproductive age. Some of these women were from other states, and some Oklahoma residents had abortions in other states, so this rate may not reflect the abortion rate of state residents. The rate declined 20% since 2008, when it was 9.8 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15–44. Oklahoma represents 0.6% of all abortions in the United States.
  • In 2010, 7,500 Oklahoma residents obtained abortions, producing a rate of 10.3 per 1,000 women of reproductive age.
  • In 2010, there were 8,860 pregnancies to Oklahoma teens aged 15–19; pregnancies that did not result in miscarriages or stillbirths, 87% resulted in live births and 13% in induced abortions.
  • In 2008, 970 teens obtained abortions in Oklahoma, producing a rate of 8 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15—19.
  • In 2011, there were 5 abortion providers in Oklahoma; 4 of those were clinics. This represents a 17% decrease in overall providers and a 25% decrease in clinics from 2008, when there were 6 abortion providers overall, of which 4 were abortion clinics.
  • In 2011, 96% of Oklahoma counties had no abortion clinic; 55% of Oklahoma women lived in these counties.

For more information, see State Facts About Abortion and State Facts about Unintended Pregnancy

PUBLICLY FUNDED CONTRACEPTIVE SERVICES

  • In 2013 in Oklahoma, publicly funded family plannng providers provided contraceptive care to 84,760 women.
  • In 2010 173 safety-net health centers served 16,350 teenagers in need of contraceptive care.
  • Publicly funded family planning providers in Oklahoma served 33% of all women in need of publicly supported contraceptive services and supplies in 2013.
  • In Oklahoma, $128 in public funds was spent on contraceptive services and supplies per woman in need in 2010.
  • In Oklahoma safety-net health centers that received some support through the federal Title X family planning program provided contraceptive care to 55,850 women in 2013.
  • In 2010, 102 safety-net health centers that received some support through the federal Title X family planning program served 10,830 teenagers in Oklahoma in need of contraceptive care.
  • Title X-supported centers in Oklahoma served 22% of all women in need of publicly supported contraceptive services and supplies in 2013.

For more information, see Contraceptive Needs and Services

For county-level data see Guttmacher's County-level Table Maker

IMPACT OF PUBLICLY FUNDED CONTRACEPTIVE SERVICES

  • Publicly funded family planning services help women to avoid pregnancies they do not want and to plan pregnancies they do. In 2013, publicly funded family planning services helped women in Oklahoma avoid 20,700 unintended pregnancies, which would likely have resulted in about 10,300 unplanned births and 7,100 abortions.
  • Contraceptive services provided at Title X-supported centers in Oklahoma helped prevent 13,600 unintended pregnancies, which would likely have resulted in about 6,700 unplanned births and 4,600 abortions.
  • The publicly funded family planning services provided at safety-net centers in Oklahoma saved the federal and state governments $135,212,000 in 2010.

For more information, see Contraceptive Needs and Services and "Return on investment: A fuller assessment of the benefits and cost savings of the US publicly funded family planning program"

STATE POLICIES

Policy Summary Table, as of July 1st, 2015

ABORTION
Abortion Policy in the Absence of Roe v. Wade
Pre-Roe abortion ban still in place
Abortion Counseling and Waiting Periods
Mandated counseling includes information designed to discourage abortion
State imposes waiting period between counseling and abortion 24 hours
Parental Involvement in Minors' Abortions
Parent must consent and be notified before an abortion
Restrictions on Private Insurance Coverage of Abortion
Insurance may only cover in cases of life endangerment
Insurance for state employees restricted Coverage in limited circumstances
Public Funding of Abortion for Poor Women
Public funding is available in cases of life endangerment, rape or incest Only life, rape or incest.
Refusal Clauses for Abortion Services
Medical professionals may refuse
Medical institutions may refuse All institutions
ADOLESCENTS
Minors' Consent to Contraceptive Services
No policy in effect 
Minors' Consent to STI Services
All or some minors explicitly permitted to consent All minors
Parental Involvement in Minors' Abortions
Parent must consent and be notified before an abortion
Sex Education
Sex education must either stress or cover abstinence Stress
State mandates STI/HIV education
STI/HIV education must either stress or cover abstinence Cover
STI/HIV education must cover contraception
CONTRACEPTION SERVICES AND FINANCING
Emergency Contraception in Emergency Rooms
No policy in effect 
Private Insurance Coverage of Contraceptive Services
No policy in effect 
Medicaid Family Planning Expansions
Eligibility for Medicaid family planning based on income 250% Federal Poverty Level
Contraceptive Access in Pharmacies
No policy in effect 
Refusal Clauses for Contraceptive Services
No policy in effect 
Minors' Consent to Contraceptive Services
No policy in effect 

For more information, see State Policies in Brief