Advancing Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights
 

Are you IN THE KNOW?

REFERENCES

1. Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations, World population prospects: the 2010 revision, 2010, < http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/index.htm >, accessed Sept. 16, 2011.

2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wonder database, Bridged-race population (vintage 2009) estimates, no date, < http://wonder.cdc.gov/bridged-race-v2009.html >, accessed Oct. 6, 2011.

3. Martinez GM et al., Fertility, contraception, and fatherhood: data on men and women from Cycle 6 (2002) of the National Survey of Family Growth, Vital and Health Statistics, Vol. 23, No. 26, 2006, < http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_23/sr23_026.pdf >, accessed Oct. 18, 2011.

4. Chandra A et al., Fertility, family planning, and reproductive health of U.S. women: data from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth, Vital and Health Statistics, Vol. 23, No. 25, 2005, < http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_23/sr23_025.pdf >, accessed Oct. 18, 2011.

5. U.S. Bureau of the Census, America’s Families and Living Arrangements , Wash ington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2010.

6. Finer LB, Trends in premarital sex in the United States, 1954–2003 , Public Health Reports, 2007, 122(1):73–78.

7. The Alan Guttmacher Institute (AGI), Fulfilling the Promise: Public Policy and U.S. Family Planning Clinics , New York: AGI, 2000.

8. Guttmacher Institute, Contraceptive Needs and Services, 2008 Update, 2010, < http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/win/contraceptive-needs-2008.pdf >, accessed Aug. 24, 2011.

9. Mosher WD and Jones J, Use of contraception in the United States: 1982–2008, Vital and Health Statistics, 2010, Series 23, No. 29, < http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_23/sr23_029.pdf >, accessed Sept. 21, 2011.

10. Jones RK and Dreweke J, Countering Conventional Wisdom: New Evidence on Religion and Contraceptive Use , New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2011.

11. Gold RB et al., Next Steps for America’s Family Planning Program: Leveraging the Potential of Medicaid and Title X in an Evolving Health Care System , New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2009.

12. World Health Organization (WHO), Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, second ed., Geneva: WHO, 2004.

13. Singh S et al., Adding It Up: The Costs and Benefits of Investing in Family Planning and Maternal and Newborn Health, New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2009.

14. Trussell J, Contraceptive failure in the United States, Contraception, 2011, 83(5):397–404.

15. Trussell J, Estimates of contraceptive failure from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth, Contraception, 2008, 78:85.

16. Kost K et al., Estimates of contraceptive failure from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth , Contraception, 2008, 77(1):10–21

17. Frost JJ, Darroch JE and Remez L, Improving contraceptive use in the United States, In Brief, New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2008, No. 1.

18. Darroch JE, Sedgh G and Ball H, Contraceptive Technologies: Responding to Women’s Needs , New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2011.

19. Kavanaugh ML et al., Characteristics of women in the United States who use long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2011, 117(6):1349–1357.

20. Guttmacher Institute, A Real-Time Look atsc the Impact of the Recession on Women’s Family Planning and Pregnancy Decisions , New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2009.

21. Guttmacher Institute, Facts on investing in family planning and maternal and newborn health, 2010, < http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/FB-AIU-summary.pdf>, accessed Sept. 29, 2011.

22. Trussel J and Raymond EG, Emergency contraception: a last chance to prevent unintended pregnancy, 2011, < http://ec.princeton.edu/questions/ec-review.pdf >, accessed Oct. 17, 2011.

23. Kavanaugh ML, Williams SL and Schwarz EB, Emergency contraception use and counseling after changes in United States prescription status, Fertility and Sterility, 2011, 98(8):2578­–2581.

24. Singh S, Sedgh G and Hussain R, Unintended pregnancy: worldwide levels, trends, and outcomes, Studies in Family Planning, 2010 , 41(4):241–250.

25. World Health Organization (WHO) et al., Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2008 , Geneva: WHO, 2010.

26. Finer LB and Zolna MR, Unintended pregnancy in the United States: incidence and disparities, 2006, Contraception, 2011, doi: 10.1016/j.contraception.2011.07.013.

27. Special tabulations of data from the National Center for Health Statistics, the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth and 2008 Guttmacher Abortion Provider Census.

28. Finer LB and Kost K, Unintended pregnancy rates at the state level, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2011, 43(2):78–87.

29. Sonfield A et al., The public costs of births resulting from unintended pregnancies: national and state-level estimates, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2011, 43(2):94–102.

30. Sedgh G et al., Induced abortion worldwide in 2008: levels and trends, Lancet , 2012 (forthcoming).

31. Jones RK and Kooistra K, Abortion incidence and access to services in the United States, 2008, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2011, 43(1):41–50.

32. Jones RK and Kavanaugh ML, Changes in abortion rates between 2000 and 2008 and lifetime incidence of abortion, Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2011, 117(6):1358–1366.

33. Tietze C and Lewit S, Abortion, Scientific American, 1969, 220(1):21–27.

34. Gold RB, Henshaw SK and Lindberg LD, Abortion and Women's Health: A Turning Point for America? New York: The Alan Guttmacher Institute, 1990.

35. World Health Organization (WHO), Unsafe Abortion: Global and Regional Estimates of the Incidence of Unsafe Abortion and Associated Mortality in 2008 , sixth ed., Geneva: WHO, 2011.

36. Singh S, Hospital admissions resulting from unsafe abortion: estimates from 13 developing countries, Lancet, 2006, 368(955):1887–1892.

37. Pazol K et al., Abortion Surveillance—United States, 2007, MMWR Surveillance Summaries, 2011, Vol. 60, No. SS-01.

38. Guttmacher Institute, Abortion and mental health, 2011, < http://www.guttmacher.org/media/evidencecheck/2011/01/31/Advisory-Abortion-Mental-Health.pdf >, accessed Oct. 13, 2011.

39. Finer LB and Wei J, Effect of Mifepristone on abortion access in the United States, Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2009, 114(3):623–630.

40. Finer LB et al., Reasons U.S. women have abortions: quantitative and qualitative perspectives, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2005, 37(3):110–118.

41. Jones RK, Finer LB and Singh S, Characteristics of U.S. Abortion Patients, 2008 , New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2010.

42. Jones RK et al., Abortion in the United States: incidence and access to services, 2005, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2008, 40(1):6–16.

43. Guttmacher Institute, Claim that most abortion clinics are located in black neighborhoods is false, 2011, < http://www.guttmacher.org/media/evidencecheck/2011/01/19/Guttmacher-Advisory.pdf >, accessed Oct. 13, 2011.

44. Singh S et al., Abortion Worldwide: A Decade of Uneven Progress, New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2009.

45. Guttmacher Institute, State funding of abortionunder Medicaid, State Policies in Brief (as of October 1, 2011), 2011, < http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_SFAM.pdf >, accessed Oct. 12, 2011.

46. Henshaw SK et al., Restrictions on Medicaid Funding for Abortions: A Literature Review , New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2009.

47. Guttmacher Institute, An overview of abortion laws, State Policies in Brief (as of October 1, 2011), 2011, < http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_OAL.pdf >, accessed Oct. 13, 2011.

48. Martinez G, Copen CE and Abma JC, Teenagers in the United States: sexual activity, contraceptive use, and childbearing, 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth, Vital and Health Statistics, Vol. 23, No. 31, 2011, < http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_23/sr23_031.pdf >, accessed Oct. 14, 2011.

49. Lloyd CB, ed., Growing Up Global: The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries , Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 2005.

50. Special analysis of data from Demographic and Health Surveys and similar country surveys for 59 countries.

51. Santelli J, Sandfort T and Orr M, Transnational comparisons of adolescent contraceptive use: what can we learn from these comparisons? Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 2008, 162(1):92–94.

52. Guttmacher Institute, Minors’ access to contraceptive services, State Policies in Brief (as of October 1, 2011), 2011, < http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_MACS.pdf >, accessed Oct. 7, 2011.

53. Jones RK and Boonstra H, Confidential reproductive health services for minors: the potential impact of mandated parental involvement for contraception, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2004, 36(5):182–191.

54. Kost K, Henshaw S and Carlin L, U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity , New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2010.

55. Martin JA et al., Births: final data for 2006, National Vital Statistics Reports, 2009, Vol. 57, No. 7.

56. Finer LB, Unintended pregnancy among U.S. adolescents: accounting for sexual activity, Journal of Adolescent Health, 2010, 47(3):312–314.

57. World Health Organization, Making pregnancy safer: adolescent pregnancy, 2011, < http://www.who.int/making_pregnancy_safer/topics/adolescent_pregnancy/en/index.html >, accessed Sept. 23, 2011.

58. Shah I and Ahman E, Age patterns of unsafe abortion in developing country regions, Reproductive Health Matters, 2004, 12(24 suppl.):9–17.

59. Warren JT, Harvey SM and Henderson JT, Do depression and low self-esteem follow abortion among adolescents? evidence from a national study, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2010, 42(4):230–235.

60. Guttmacher Institute, Parental involvement in minors’ abortions, State Policies in Brief (as of October 1, 2011), 2011, < http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_PIMA.pdf >, accessed Sept. 22, 2011.

61. Dennis A et al., The impact of laws requiring parental involvement for abortion: a literature review , New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2009.

62. Weinstock H, Berman S and Cates, Jr., W, Sexually transmitted diseases among American youth: incidence and prevalence estimates, 2000, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2004, 36(1):6–10.

63. Darroch JE et al., Teenage sexual and reproductive behavior in developed countries: Can more progress be made? Occasional Report, New York: The Alan Guttmacher Institute, 2001, No. 3.

64. Guttmacher Institute, Minors’ access to STI services, State Policies in Brief (as of October 1, 2011), 2011, < http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_MASS.pdf >, accessed Oct. 7, 2011.

65.   Jones RK and Biddlecom AE, The more things change…: the relative importance of the internet as a source of contraceptive information for teens, Sexuality Research and Social Policy, 2011, 8(1):27–37.

66. Guttmacher Institute, Sex and HIV education, State Policies in Brief (as of October 1, 2011), 2011, < http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_SE.pdf >, accessed Oct. 7, 2011.

67. Martinez G, Abma J and Casey C, Educating teenagers about sex in the United States, NCHS Data Brief, 2010, No. 44.

68. Special Guttmacher Institute tabulations of data from the National Center for Health Statistics, the 2006–2008 National Survey of Family Growth.

69. Ecker N and Kirby D, International Guidelines on Sexuality Education: An Evidence Informed Approach to Effective Sex, Relationships and HIV/STI Education , Paris: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 2009.

70. Committee on Government Reform—Minority Staff, United States House of Representatives, The content of federally funded abstinence only education programs, 2004, < http://democrats.oversight.house.gov/images/stories/documents/20041201102153-50247.pdf>, accessed Aug. 18, 2011.

71. Kirby D, Emerging Answers 2007: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 2007.