Purpose

The purpose of this study was to describe adolescents' and young adults' concerns about confidential reproductive health care and experience with time alone with a provider, and examine the association of these confidentiality issues with receipt of contraceptive services.


Methods

Data from the 2013 to 2015 National Survey of Family Growth were analyzed using Poisson regression to describe 15- to 25-year-olds' confidential reproductive health-care concerns and time alone with a provider at last health-care visit according to sociodemographic characteristics. We also assessed whether confidentiality issues were associated with obtaining contraceptive services among females.


Results

Concerns about confidential reproductive health care were less common among 15- to 17-year-olds who were covered by Medicaid compared to their parents' private insurance (adjusted risk ratio [ARR] = .61, confidence interval [CI] .41–.91) and had high-school graduate mothers compared to college-graduate mothers (ARR = .68, CI .47–.99), and were more common among those who lived with neither parent compared to living with both parents (ARR = 2.0, CI 1.27–3.16). Time alone with a provider was more common among black girls than white girls (ARR = 1.57, CI 1.11–2.22) and less common among girls covered by Medicaid than those with parents' private insurance (ARR = .72, CI .56–.92). Time alone was less common among boys living with neither parent compared to living with two parents (ARR = .48, CI .25–.91) and with high-school graduate mothers compared to college-graduate mothers (ARR = .59, CI .42–.84). Among sexually experienced girls and women, confidentiality concerns were associated with a reduced likelihood of having received a contraceptive service in the past year.


Conclusions

Greater efforts are needed to support young Americans in receiving confidential care.