Advancing Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights
 

Monthly State Update:
MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS IN 2011

(as of 4/1/2011)

This update provides information on legislation, as well as relevant executive branch actions and judicial decisions in states across the country. For each of the topics listed below, the number of states in which legislation has been introduced is given, as are the names of the states in which subsequent action has been taken. Detailed summaries are provided for legislation that has been passed by at least one house of a legislature and for major court decisions; actions for the current month are in bold. For an archive of previous monthly updates, click here.  

As of the beginning of April, legislatures in 42 states (AL,AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, TN, TX, VT, WA and WI) and the District of Columbia were in regular session. One state (LA) has not yet convened its regular session. Seven state legislatures (KY, NM, SD, UT, VA, WV and WY) have adjourned their sessions.

For a state-by-state chart of legislation enacted in 2011, click here.

 

 

Jump to actions around:

Abortion

Adolescents

Contraception & Prevention

Pregnancy & Birth

Refusal Clauses

Reproductive Health and Environmental Hazards

 

ABORTION

Abortion Bans to Replace Roe

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 19 states

Bill Statute:

Passed at least one chamber in MT, OK, ND and VA

MONTANA: In March, the House approved two measures that seek to ban abortion through a ballot initiative to amend the constitutional definition of “person” to include “all members of the species Homo sapiens at any stage of development, including the stage of fertilization or conception.” The bills are awaiting action in the Senate.

NORTH DAKOTA: In February, the House approved a bill that would ban abortion by defining a human being as an “an individual member of the species homo sapiens at every stage of development.” The bill, which would allow for lifesaving medical treatment and the use of contraceptives, is awaiting action in the Senate.

OKLAHOMA: In March, the House approved a measure that seeks to ban abortion by amending the statutory definition of “person” to include “a human being at all stages of human development of life, including the state of fertilization or conception.” The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

VIRGINIA: In February, a Senate committee defeated a measure that would have banned abortion by defining a human being within state law as “the offspring of human beings from the moment of conception until birth at every stage of biological development.” The bill passed the House in February.

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Abortion Clinic Regulation

Requiring Abortion Providers to Have Hospital Privileges

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 8 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in IN, MS and OK

INDIANA: In February, the Senate approved a measure that would require an abortion provider to have admitting privileges at a hospital located in the same county as the abortion clinic or in an adjacent county. The bill, which would also amend the state’s parental consent law and abortion counseling requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.

MISSISSIPPI: In January, the Senate approved a measure that would require any physician “associated with” an abortion facility to have admitting and staff privileges at a local hospital. The measure, which also would require any such physician to be board certified or eligible in obstetrics and gynecology, is awaiting action in the House.

OKLAHOMA: In March, the House adopted a measure that would require abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the abortion facility that provides gynecologic or obstetric care. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers

Introduced in 17 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in AR, IN and MS

Enacted in UT and VA

ARKANSAS: In March, the legislature adopted a measure that would require a facility in which at least 10 abortions, including medication abortions, are performed per month to be licensed and inspected by the state. The measure is awaiting action by Gov. Mike Beebe (D). (The measure was signed in early April.)

ARKANSAS: In March, the Senate adopted a measure that would require abortion providers to have a signed contract with a second physician who will handle complications from a medication abortion. This contracted physician would have to have hospital admitting privileges, including gynecologic or surgical privileges. The measure, which includes other provisions related to medication abortion, is awaiting action in the House.

ARKANSAS: In March, the Senate adopted a measure that would define any facility in which more than five first-trimester surgical abortions are performed per month or in which any second- or third-trimester abortions are performed as ambulatory surgical centers, making them subject to all regulations for ambulatory surgical centers. The measure is awaiting action in the House.

INDIANA: In March, the House adopted an omnibus abortion measure that would require abortion providers to have either admitting privileges or an agreement with a physician who has admitting privileges at a hospital that is in the same county as the abortion clinic or in an adjacent county in order to handle complications from an abortion. The measure, which also includes provisions related to counseling, abortion at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation, abortion coverage in the health exchange, medical emergency, ultrasound and reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.

MISSISSIPPI: In January, the Senate approved a measure that would require any physician “associated with” an abortion facility to have admitting and staff privileges at a local hospital. The measure, which also would require any such physician to be board certified or eligible in obstetrics and gynecology, is awaiting action in the House.

(ENACTED) UTAH: In March, Gov. Gary Herbert (R) signed a measure that requires the Department of Health to issue regulations governing facilities and physicians’ offices that provide abortion services. The bill passed the legislature in March.

(ENACTED) VIRGINIA: In March, Gov. Bob McDonnell (D) signed a measure that classifies any facility that provides more than five abortions per month as a hospital. The bill also requires the Board of Health to develop regulations for these facilities. The bill passed the legislature in February.

VIRGINIA: In February, a Senate committee defeated a bill that would have required the state Department of Health to develop regulations for facilities that provide 25 or more first-trimester abortions during any 12-month period. The bill passed the House in February.

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Crisis Pregnancy Centers

''Choose Life' License Plates

Click here for current status of state policy on 'Choose Life' License Plate laws

Introduced in 9 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in TX

Enacted in UT

TEXAS: In March, the Senate approved a measure that would authorize the sale of “Choose Life” license plates; money generated from the sale of the plates would be allocated to crisis pregnancy centers across the state. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

(ENACTED) UTAH: In March, Gov. Gary Herbert (R) signed a measure that authorizes the sale of “Choose Life” license plates in Utah; license plate holders will be required to make a $25 annual donation to the “Choose Life Adoption Support Restricted Account.” The measure passed the legislature in March.

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Regulation of Crisis Pregnancy Centers

Introduced in 5 states

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State Funding of Alternatives-to-Abortion Services

Introduced in 1 state

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in MO

MISSOURI: In March, the House approved a measure that would allocate $1.6 million to provide alternatives-to-abortion services for any pregnant woman at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. The program offers a range of services to a woman during her pregnancy and for one year following birth. The measure, which would also prohibit the funds from being used for services related to family planning or abortion or from being provided to organizations that offer abortions or abortion referrals, is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Insurance Coverage of Abortion

Abortion Coverage in Health Plans Offered Through Health Exchanges

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 21 states (These bills may overlap with bills in Private Insurance Coverage.)

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in  AR, ID, IN, MT, OK, SC and VA

Enacted in UT

ARKANSAS: In January, the Senate passed a measure that would ban abortion coverage in the health insurance exchange that will be established under the federal health care reform law unless the woman’s life is endangered. Additional abortion coverage could be purchased at an additional cost. Insurers would be required to notify enrollees of the cost of this coverage and to obtain the enrollee’s written verification that they want coverage for abortion. The bill is awaiting action in the House.

IDAHO: In March, the legislature passed a measure that would limit abortion coverage through the health insurance exchange that will be established under the federal health care reform legislation. Plans offered on the exchange may include coverage of abortion only in cases of life endangerment, rape or incest. The bill is awaiting action by Gov. C.L. Otter (R). (This measure was signed in early April.)

INDIANA: In March, the House passed an omnibus abortion measure that would ban abortion coverage in the health exchanges that will be developed under federal health care reform. The measure, which also includes provisions related to counseling, abortions at or after 20 weeks’ gestation, hospital privileges for providers, medical emergency, ultrasound and reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.

MONTANA: In March, the Senate passed a measure that would limit abortion coverage through the health insurance exchange that will be established under the federal health care reform legislation. Plans offered on the exchange may include coverage of abortion only in cases of life endangerment, rape or incest. The bill, which passed the House in February, is awaiting action by Gov. Brian Schweitzer (D). (The measure was vetoed by the governor in early April.)

OKLAHOMA: In March, the Senate passed a measure that would restrict abortion coverage through the health insurance exchange that will be established under federal health care reform. Plans offered on the exchange may include coverage of abortion only in cases of life endangerment.  Additional abortion coverage could be purchased at an additional cost. Insurers would be required to notify enrollees of the cost of this coverage. Current law prohibits abortion coverage in all private health plans except in cases of life endangerment, rape and incest, and permits additional coverage only through the purchase of a separate rider. The bill, which also restricts abortion coverage in all private health plans, is awaiting action in the House. 

SOUTH CAROLINA: In March, the House passed a measure that would ban abortion coverage in the health insurance exchange that will be established under federal health care reform law unless the woman’s life is endangered. Additional coverage could be purchased at an additional cost. The bill, which also includes a provision on prohibiting abortion coverage in all private insurance plans, is awaiting action in the Senate.

(ENACTED) UTAH: In March, Gov. Gary Herbert (R) signed a measure that bans abortion coverage in the health insurance exchange that will be established under federal health care reform except in cases of life endangerment, fetal abnormality, rape, incest or a possible “substantial and irreversible impairment” to the woman’s health. The bill, which also includes a provision on prohibiting abortion coverage in private insurance plans, passed the legislature in March and goes into effect in January.

VIRGINIA: In February, a Senate committee defeated a measure that would have banned abortion coverage in the health insurance exchange that will be established under the federal health care reform law except in cases of rape or incest that is reported to police. The bill passed the House in February. (A similar bill was enacted in early April.)

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Private Insurance Coverage of Abortion

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 12 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in OK and SC

Enacted in UT

OKLAHOMA: In March, the Senate passed a measure that would prohibit private health plans from covering abortions, except when necessary to save the woman’s life. Additional coverage could be purchased at an additional cost. Insurers would be required to notify enrollees of the cost of this coverage. Current law prohibits abortion coverage in all private health plans except in cases of life endangerment, rape and incest, and permits additional coverage only through the purchase of a separate rider.  The bill, which would also limit abortion coverage through the health insurance exchange, is awaiting action in the House.

SOUTH CAROLINA: In March, the House approved a measure that would prohibit private insurers’ health plans from covering elective abortions, except when necessary to save the woman’s life. Additional coverage could be purchased at an additional cost. The bill, which would also limit abortion coverage through the health insurance exchange, is awaiting action in the House.

(ENACTED) UTAH: In March, Gov. Gary Herbert (R) approved a measure that would prohibit private insurers’ health plans from covering elective abortions, except when necessary to save the woman’s life. The bill, which would also limit abortion coverage through the health insurance exchange, passed the legislature in March and goes into effect in January.

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Public Funding of Abortion for Low-Income Women

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 14 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in AK and MD

ALASKA: In March, the House approved an appropriations bill that would limit Medicaid funding for abortion to cases of rape, incest or life endangerment. Currently, the state is under a court order to fund all medically necessary abortions. The bill is awaiting action by the Senate. 

MARYLAND: In March, the legislature approved an appropriations bill that would reenact current restrictions limiting public funding of abortion to cases of incest, rape, life or health endangerment and fetal abnormality. The bill is pending consideration by conference committee.

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Later Term Abortion

'Partial-Birth' Abortion

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 5 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in KS

KANSAS: In March, the Senate adopted an omnibus abortion measure that would further restrict provision of “partial-birth” abortions by removing the current law’s health exception and allowing the procedure only if the woman’s life is at risk. The bill would require an abortion provider and another physician who is unaffiliated with the provider to certify that the use of “partial-birth” abortion is necessary to save the woman’s life. The measure would also redefine “partial-birth” abortion to mirror the federal definition as upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court. The bill, which passed the House in February, also includes provisions on postviability abortion, parental consent and counseling, mandatory reporting of statutory rape and reporting requirements for abortions and minors’ judicial waivers. It is awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R). (The bill was enacted in early April.)

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'Postviability' Abortion

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 5 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in KS and MO

KANSAS: In March, the Senate adopted an omnibus abortion measure that would define viability as the point in gestation when “the life of the child can be continued indefinitely outside the mother’s womb with natural or artificial life-supportive measures.” Current law considers a fetus viable when it “is capable of sustained survival outside the uterus without the application of extraordinary measures.” The bill, which passed the House in February, also includes provisions on parental consent, counseling, “partial-birth” abortion, mandatory reporting of statutory rape and reporting requirements for abortions and minors’ judicial waivers. It is awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R). (The bill was enacted in April.)

MISSOURI: In March, the House adopted a measure that would amend the state’s postviability statute by requiring that viability be determined through the use of “accepted obstetrical and neonatal standards.” The measure would also ban abortion after viability except in cases of medical emergency when a woman’s life is endangered or when there is a “serious risk of substantial and irreversible” impairment to her physical health. Abortions after viability may only be performed if a second and unaffiliated physician certifies the need for the abortion and if a second physician attends the procedure. The bill, which also includes provisions on medical emergency and abortion reporting, is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Restricts Abortion After Specific Gestational Age

Introduced in 17 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in ID, IN, IA, KS and OK

IDAHO: In March, the Senate passed a measure that would ban abortion at or after 20 weeks’ gestation based on an assumption that a fetus can feel pain at that point of development. The bill would permit abortions at or beyond 20 weeks in cases when the procedure is necessary to protect the woman’s life or to avert a “substantial and irreversible impairment” to her physical health. The limited medical emergency exception was specifically designed to prohibit abortions performed to preserve a woman’s mental health. The bill, which also includes provisions on abortion reporting and medical emergency, is awaiting action in the House.

INDIANA: In March, the House passed an omnibus abortion measure that would ban abortion at or after 20 weeks’ gestation based on the assumption that a fetus can feel pain at that point of development. The bill would permit abortions at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation in cases when the woman’s life is endangered or when there is a risk of “substantial physical impairment” to her health. The measure, which also includes provisions related to counseling, coverage in the health exchange, hospital privileges for providers, medical emergency, ultrasound and reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.

IOWA: In March, the House passed a measure that would ban abortion at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation based on the notion that a fetus can feel pain at that point of development. The bill would permit abortions at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation in cases when the woman’s life is endangered or when there is a chance of “substantial and irreversible impairment” of her physical health. The bill, which also includes provisions on abortion reporting and medical emergency, is awaiting action in the Senate.

KANSAS: In March, the Senate passed a measure that would ban abortion at or after 20 weeks’ gestation based on the notion that a fetus can feel pain at that point of development. The bill would permit abortions at or after 20 weeks’ gestation in cases when the woman’s life is endangered or when there is a chance of “substantial and irreversible impairment” of her physical health, but the exception would specifically prohibit abortions performed to preserve a woman’s mental health. The bill, which passed the House in February, also includes provisions on medical emergency exceptions and abortion reporting requirements. It is awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R). (The bill was enacted in early April.)

OKLAHOMA: In March, the House passed a measure that would ban abortion at or after 20 weeks’ gestation based on the notion that a fetus can feel pain at that point of development. The bill would permit abortions at or after 20 weeks’ gestation in cases when the woman’s life is endangered or when there is a chance of “substantial and irreversible impairment” of her physical health. The limited medical emergency exception was specifically designed to prohibit abortions performed to preserve a woman’s mental health. The bill, which also includes provisions on medical emergency and abortion reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Mandatory Counseling and Waiting Periods Before Abortion

State-Directed Counseling

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 6 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in IN, KS, MT and ND

INDIANA: In March, the House approved an omnibus abortion measure that would expand the state’s abortion counseling requirements to include information on the fetus’s purported ability to feel pain and on the scientifically dubious link between abortion and breast cancer. The bill, which also includes provisions related to abortion at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation, abortion coverage in the health exchange, hospital privileges for providers, medical emergency, ultrasound and reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate. 

INDIANA: In February, the Senate approved a measure that would amend the state’s abortion counseling requirements and require an abortion provider to offer an ultrasound to a woman seeking an abortion. The bill would require that abortion counseling include information on fetal pain as well as statements that having an abortion increases a woman’s risk of breast cancer and that personhood begins at conception. The bill, which would also amend the state’s parental consent law and require an abortion provider to have hospital admitting privileges, is awaiting action in the House.

KANSAS: In March, the Senate approved an omnibus abortion measure that would expand abortion counseling to include a written statement that an abortion “will terminate the life of a whole, separate, unique, living human being.” The bill, which also includes provisions on postviability abortion, parental consent and “partial-birth” abortion, and reporting requirements for abortions and minors’ judicial waivers, passed the House in February and is awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R). (The bill was enacted in April.)

MONTANA: In March, the Senate defeated a measure that would have expanded the state’s abortion counseling requirements.  The measure would have required abortion counselors to inform women of any research showing that some groups of women (based on their “physical, psychological, demographic or situational” characteristics) may be at higher risk of complications associated with having had an abortion. The bill, which also includes an exception for abortions necessary due to a medical emergency, passed the House in February.

NORTH DAKOTA: In February, the House adopted an omnibus bill that would require the state to develop counseling materials that include information on the purported link between abortion and an increased risk of breast cancer and a statement that the state prefers childbirth to abortion. The measure would also require abortion providers to give the woman “any” information that a “reasonable person” would consider important when considering abortion. The measure, which also includes provisions on medication abortion, medical emergency, abortion reporting requirements and parental consent, is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Fetal Pain

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 5 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in IN

Defeated by one chamber in WY

INDIANA: In February, the Senate approved a measure that would amend the state’s abortion counseling requirements and require an abortion provider to offer an ultrasound to a woman seeking an abortion. The bill would require that abortion counseling include information on fetal pain as well as statements that having an abortion increases a woman’s risk of breast cancer and that personhood begins at conception. The bill, which would also amend the state’s parental consent law and require an abortion provider to have hospital admitting privileges, is awaiting action in the House.

WYOMING: In January, the House defeated a measure that would have required a provider to inform a woman seeking an abortion after 19 weeks’ gestation of the purported ability of the fetus to feel pain and that fetal anesthesia is available. The measure, which also would have established an in-person counseling requirement with a 24-hour waiting period, is dead for the year.

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Requirements for State-Directed Counseling Followed by a Waiting Period

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 11 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in AR, KY and TX

Defeated by one chamber in WY

Enacted in SD

ARKANSAS: In March, the Senate approved a bill that would require an abortion provider to test for a fetal heartbeat at least 24 hours before an abortion is performed and to inform the woman if a fetal heartbeat is detected; thus requiring the woman to make two trips to the abortion provider. Currently, the state permits abortion counseling to be provided over the phone the day before a procedure is scheduled. The bill is awaiting action in the House.

KENTUCKY: In January, the Senate approved a bill that would require that a woman seeking an abortion receive counseling in person at least 24 hours prior to the procedure, thus requiring her to make two trips to the clinic. The bill would also require an ultrasound to be performed as part of the abortion procedure. No further action is expected since the legislature has adjourned its regular session.

(ENACTED) SOUTH DAKOTA: In March, Gov.  Dennis Daugaard (R) signed into law a measure that would require a woman seeking an abortion to obtain in-person counseling from the physician who will perform the procedure at least 72 hours prior to the abortion; it would also require her to make at least one visit to a crisis pregnancy center in the interim. (Currently, the state does not mandate in-person counseling, but requires the woman to wait 24 hours between counseling and the procedure.) The bill would also require abortion counselors to inform women of any research showing that some groups of women (based on their “physical, psychological, demographic or situational” characteristics) may be at higher risk of complications associated with having had an abortion. The bill, which passed the House in February and the Senate in March, goes into effect in July. 

TEXAS: In March, the House approved a measure that would require a woman seeking an abortion to receive counseling 24–72 hours before the abortion is performed, thus requiring the woman to make two trips to the abortion clinic. Some of the mandated abortion counseling would also have to be provided by the abortion provider. The bill, which also requires that the provider perform an ultrasound, is awaiting action in the Senate.

WYOMING: In February, a Senate committee defeated a measure that would have required a woman seeking an abortion to receive counseling in person at least 24 hours prior to the procedure, thus requiring her to make two trips to the clinic. The bill, which would have also required providers to offer an ultrasound to be performed as part of the abortion procedure, passed the House in February.

WYOMING: In January, the House defeated a measure that would have required a woman seeking an abortion to wait at least 24 hours after receiving in-person counseling to receive an abortion, thus requiring her to make two trips to the clinic. The measure would have also required the provider to offer her an ultrasound and to provide information on the purported ability of a fetus to feel pain if the woman was seeking the abortion after 19 weeks’ gestation.

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Medical Emergency Exception in Abortion Law

Introduced in 18 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in ID, IN, IA, KS, MO, ND and OK

IDAHO: In March, the House approved a measure that would limit access to abortions at or after 20 weeks’ gestation to cases in which the woman would face “substantial” and “irreversible” physical impairment if she continued the pregnancy; this provision would also preclude any mental health condition as a justification for abortion. The bill, which also includes provisions on abortions at or after 20 weeks’ gestation and reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the House.   

INDIANA: In March, the House approved a measure that would ban abortions at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation except in a medical emergency, defined as cases where a woman’s life is in danger or when the continuation of the pregnancy would cause a “substantial physical impairment” to the woman. The bill, which also includes provisions related to counseling, abortion at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation, abortion coverage in the health exchange, hospital privileges for providers, ultrasound and reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.

IOWA: In March, the House approved a measure that would ban abortions at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation except in a medical emergency, and limit this exception to cases where a woman’s life is in danger or when the continuation of the pregnancy would cause a “substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.” The bill, which would also establish additional reporting requirements and requirements for abortions at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation, is awaiting action in the Senate.

KANSAS: In March, the Senate approved a measure that would ban abortions at or after 20 weeks’ gestation except in a medical emergency, and limit this exception to cases where a woman’s life is in danger or when the continuation of the pregnancy would cause a “substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.” The bill, which passed the House in February and would also establish additional abortion reporting requirements, is awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R). (The measure was enacted in April.)

MISSOURI: In March, the House approved a measure that would limit access to postviability abortion to cases in which the woman would face a “serious risk of substantial and irreversible” impairment to her physical health; this provision would also preclude any mental health condition as a justification for abortion. The bill, which also includes provisions on postviability abortions and reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.   

NORTH DAKOTA: In February, the House adopted an omnibus bill that would narrow the so-called emergency exception clause in existing state law that allows abortion providers to bypass state requirements, such as a mandated waiting period, in cases when the woman’s life is endangered or if she is at risk of “substantial or irreversible physical impairment.” The bill would specify that the emergency exception could not be invoked because the provider believes the woman may commit suicide or otherwise injure herself. The bill, which includes provisions on abortion counseling, medication abortion, abortion reporting requirements and parental consent, is awaiting action in the Senate.

OKLAHOMA: In March, the House approved a measure that would ban abortions at or after 20 weeks’ gestation except in a medical emergency, and limit this exception to cases where a woman’s life is in danger or when the continuation of the pregnancy would cause a “substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.” The bill, which also includes provisions on abortion at or after 20 weeks’ gestation and reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Medication Abortion

Introduced in 12 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in AR, ND and OK

ARIZONA: In March, the House adopted measure that would prohibit prescribing medication for abortion remotely through telemedicine. The bill, which would also require a woman to undergo an ultrasound before obtaining an abortion, passed the Senate in February. (The measure was signed in early April.)

ARKANSAS: In March, the Senate approved a measure that would allow only physicians to prescribe and administer any abortion-inducing drug, including mifepristone. The measure would also prohibit prescribing medication for abortion remotely through telemedicine and require doctors to provide women with a copy of the medication’s label. The bill, which also would also impose hospital-related requirements on abortion providers, is awaiting action in the House.

NORTH DAKOTA: In February, the House adopted an omnibus bill that would require that medication for abortion be administered only by a physician and that the physician and the woman be in the same room when the medication is provided, effectively eliminating the option of using telemedicine. The measure also requires the abortion provider to use the FDA approved protocol when providing a medication abortion and contract with a second physician with admitting rights at a local hospital to handle complications. The measure would also require the abortion provider to contract with a second physician with admitting rights at a local hospital to handle complications. The measure, which also includes provisions on abortion counseling, medical emergency, abortion reporting requirements and parental consent, is awaiting action in the Senate.

OKLAHOMA: In March, the House approved a measure that would specify that only physicians have the authority to prescribe and administer any abortion-inducing drug, including mifepristone. The measure would also prohibit prescribing medication for abortion remotely through telemedicine and require doctors to provide the woman with a copy of the medication’s label. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Parental Involvement in Minor's Abortions

Parental Consent Requirements

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 15 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in IN, KS, MS, ND and OH

INDIANA: In February, the Senate approved a measure that would require a minor seeking a court order to waive the state’s parental consent requirement to petition a court in either her county of residence or the county where the abortion clinic is located. The bill would also prohibit abortion clinic staff or anyone associated with the clinic from assisting a minor in obtaining the waiver. The bill, which would also amend the state’s abortion counseling requirements and require an abortion provider to have hospital admitting privileges, is awaiting action in the House.

KANSAS: In March, the Senate adopted an omnibus abortion measure that would require notarized written consent from two parents before a minor obtains an abortion.  Consent of both parents would not be required if they are divorced, a parent is unavailable to give consent or if the minor is pregnant as a result of sexual abuse by the male parent. Kansas law currently requires the abortion provider to notify a parent about the abortion. The bill would also mandate that a judge use specific criteria to determine if there is “clear and convincing evidence” that the minor is sufficiently mature or that the abortion is in her best interests prior to waiving the state’s parental consent requirement. The bill, which passed the House in February, also includes provisions on postviability abortion, counseling and “partial-birth” abortion, mandatory reporting of statutory rape and reporting requirements for abortions and minors’ judicial waivers. It is awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R). (The measure was signed in April.)

MISSISSIPPI: In January, the Senate passed a bill that would make it a crime to intentionally assist a minor in obtaining an abortion without the parental consent mandated by state law, even if the procedure was performed in a state where parental involvement was not required. The bill would also mandate the reporting of sexual abuse of a child and require the preservation of fetal tissue in the case of some minors’ abortions. The bill is awaiting action in the House.

NORTH DAKOTA: In February, the House adopted an omnibus bill that would require a judge to determine if there is “clear and convincing evidence” that a minor is sufficiently mature or if the abortion is in her best interests prior to waiving the state’s parental consent requirement. The bill would also allow the court to release statistical information about waiver petitions. The measure, which also includes provisions on abortion counseling, medication abortion, medical emergency and abortion reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.

OHIO: In March, the House passed a measure that would require a judge to use specific criteria when determining whether to grant a minor’s petition for an abortion without parental consent. The measure would require the judge to assess the minor’s ability to understand and react to possible physical and emotional complications resulting from the abortion and to determine if anyone prepped the minor with specific responses to the judge’s questions. When deciding whether to grant a petition, the judge would have to use the “clear and convincing evidence” standard, which is stricter than the common standard of proof in civil cases. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Parental Notification Requirements

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 12 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in MT and NH

MONTANA: In March, the House passed a measure that would place on the 2012 ballot the question of whether to require abortion providers to notify the parents of a minor seeking an abortion 48 hours before the procedure is performed. The proposal would allow the minor to seek a court order to waive the requirement and permit an abortion without notification in the case of a medical emergency. Montana’s current parental notification law is enjoined. The measure, which also prohibits coercing a minor to have an abortion, passed the Senate in February. It is in conference committee.

MONTANA: In March, the House passed a measure that would require an abortion provider to notify a parent of a minor seeking an abortion at least 48 hours before the procedure is performed. The bill would allow the minor to seek a court order to permit an abortion without notification in the case of a medical emergency. Montana’s current parental notification law is enjoined. The bill is awaiting action in a conference committee.

NEW HAMPSHIRE: In March, the House passed a measure that would require abortion providers to notify a parent of a minor seeking an abortion 48 hours before the procedure. The bill would allow the minor to seek a court order to permit an abortion without notification in the case of a medical emergency. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Physicians

Physician Liability

Introduced in 3 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in GA

GEORGIA: In March, the Senate approved a bill that would permit a woman who has had an abortion in violation of the law to press civil charges against the physician and claim damages equaling the value of the life of the “unborn child.” The bill is awaiting action in the House. 

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Physician-Only Requirements

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 4 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in AZ and MS

ARIZONA: In March, the Senate adopted a measure that would prohibit physician assistants from prescribing medication for abortion. It is awaiting action in the House.

ARIZONA: In March, the Senate adopted a measure that would prohibit the state nursing board from issuing rules that would allow abortion provision by nurses. Currently, the nursing board permits nurse practitioners in Arizona to perform first-trimester abortions. It is awaiting action in the House.

MISSISSIPPI: In January, the Senate approved a measure that would require any physician “associated with” an abortion clinic to be board certified or eligible in obstetrics and gynecology. The bill, which also would require physicians to have admitting and staff privileges at a local hospital, is awaiting action in the House.

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Prohibiting Coercing a Woman into Having an Abortion

Introduced in 6 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in MT

MONTANA: In March, the House adopted a measure that will place on the 2012 ballot the question of whether to make it a crime for a parent, guardian or any other person to coerce a minor into having an abortion. The bill, which would also require parental notification for a minor seeking an abortion, passed the Senate in February. It is awaiting action by Gov. Brian Schweitzer (D).

MONTANA: In March, the House approved a measure that would make it a crime for a parent, guardian or any other person to coerce a minor into having an abortion. The bill, which would also require parental notification for a minor seeking an abortion, is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Protecting Access

Clinic Access

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 2 states

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Ensuring Legal Access to Abortion

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Introduced in 5 states

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Reporting Requirements

Abortion Reporting

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 22 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in ID, IN, IA, KS, MO, ND and OK

IDAHO: In March, the Senate approved a measure that would revise the state’s abortion reporting requirements for abortions performed at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation. The measure would require providers to report the specific medical diagnosis that necessitated the procedure after that point. The bill, which also would limit abortion at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation to cases of medical emergency, is awaiting action in the Senate.

INDIANA: In March, the House approved an omnibus abortion measure that would revise the reporting requirements for abortions performed at or after 20 weeks’ gestation. The measure would require providers to report the specific medical diagnosis that necessitated the procedure. The bill, which also includes provisions related to counseling, abortion at or after 20 weeks’ gestation, abortion coverage in the health exchange, hospital privileges for providers, medical emergency and ultrasound, is awaiting action in the Senate.

INDIANA: In March, the House approved a measure that would expand the state’s abortion reporting requirements to include information on the age of the woman’s partner, the date of the abortion procedure and the date the report is received by the state. The bill, which also includes provisions on reporting requirements for minors’ abortions, is awaiting action in the Senate. 

IOWA: In March, the House approved a measure that would revise the state’s abortion reporting requirements for abortions performed at or after 20 weeks’ gestation. The measure would require providers to report the specific medical diagnosis that necessitated the procedure. The bill, which would also limit abortion at or after 20 weeks’ gestation and narrow the medical emergency clause in current law, is waiting action by the Senate.

KANSAS: In March, the Senate approved an omnibus abortion measure that would expand the state’s abortion reporting requirements for abortions performed after 21 weeks’ gestation. In the case of an abortion after 21 weeks the reporting form would require the abortion provider and another physician who is unaffiliated with the provider to certify the need for the abortion and provide detailed information on the medical diagnosis necessitating the procedure. The bill would also permit district and county attorneys to have access to women’s confidential information. The bill, which includes provisions on postviability abortion, parental consent, reporting requirements for minors’ judicial waivers, counseling and “partial-birth” abortion, passed the House in February and is awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R).  (The measure was signed in April.)

KANSAS: In March, the Senate approved a measure that would revise the state’s abortion reporting requirements for abortions performed at or after 20 weeks’ gestation. The measure would require providers to report the specific medical diagnosis that necessitated the procedure. The bill, which passed the House in February and would limit abortion at or after 20 weeks’ gestation and expand abortion reporting requirements, is awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R). (The measure was signed in early April.)

MISSOURI: In March, the House approved a measure that would revise the state’s reporting requirements for abortions performed at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation. The measure would require providers to report the specific medical diagnosis that necessitated the procedure. The bill, which also would limit abortion at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation and limit the permissible conditions for abortion in cases of medical emergency, is awaiting action in the Senate.

NORTH DAKOTA: In February, the House adopted an omnibus bill that would require abortion providers to report “adverse events” from medication abortion to the state and to submit reporting forms within 24 hours of an abortion procedure. The bill, which also includes provisions on abortion counseling, medication abortion, medical emergency and parental consent, is awaiting action in the Senate.

OKLAHOMA: In March, the House approved a measure that would revise the state’s abortion reporting requirements for abortions performed at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation. The measure would require providers to report the specific medical diagnosis that necessitated the procedure.  The bill, which also would limit abortion at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation to cases of medical emergency, is awaiting action in the House.

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Minors Reporting

Introduced in 6 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in IN and KS

INDIANA: In March, the House passed a measure that would require abortion providers to report procedures performed on minors younger than 14 to the state within three days of the procedure. The bill, which also includes provisions on abortion reporting, is awaiting action in the Senate.

KANSAS: In March, the Senate adopted an omnibus abortion measure that would require judges to give the Department of Health information on the number of cases where a minor petitioned for a court waiver of parental consent and the number of waivers that were granted. The bill, which passed the House in February, also includes provisions on abortion reporting requirements, postviability abortion, parental consent, counseling, mandatory reporting of statutory rape and “partial-birth” abortion. It is awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R). (The measure was signed in early April.)

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Self-Induced Abortion

Introduced in 1 state

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Sex and Race Selection

Introduced in 5 states

Bill Status:

Enacted in AZ

(ENACTED) ARIZONA: In March, Gov. Jan Brewer (R) signed a measure that criminalizes the provision of an abortion if the provider knows the reason for the abortion is related to the race or gender of the fetus. The bill, which also prohibits coercing a woman into an abortion based on race or gender, passed the House in February and the Senate in March.

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State Employee and Facility Participation in Abortion

Introduced in 4 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in AZ

ARIZONA: In February, the House approved a bill that would prohibit state universities from using state or federal funds to train abortion providers. The measure, which would also prohibit citizens from claiming a tax credit for donations to any organization that “provides, pays for, promotes, provides coverage of or provides referrals for abortions,” is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Ultrasound Requirements

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 18 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in IN, KY and TX

Enacted in AZ

(ENACTED) ARIZONA: In March, Gov. Jan Brewer (R) signed into law a bill that requires a woman to undergo an ultrasound at least one hour before obtaining an abortion. The measure also requires providers to offer the woman the option to view the ultrasound image, listen to the fetal heartbeat, receive a verbal description of the image and receive a picture of it. The bill, which prohibits medication for abortions from being prescribed remotely through telemedicine, passed the Senate in February and the House in March. It goes into effect in August.

INDIANA: In March, the House adopted an omnibus abortion measure that would require an abortion provider to perform an ultrasound prior to an abortion and give the woman the option to see the image or hear a description of it. The bill, which also includes provisions related to counseling, abortion at or beyond 20 weeks’ gestation, abortion coverage in the health exchange, hospital privileges for providers, medical emergency and reporting requirements, is awaiting action in the Senate.

KENTUCKY: In January, the Senate approved a measure that would require an abortion provider or a certified technician to perform an ultrasound prior to an abortion. The provider would be required to display and describe the ultrasound image to the woman, although the woman would be permitted to avert her eyes from the image. The measure would also require that a woman seeking an abortion receive in-person counseling at least 24 hours prior to the procedure. No further action is expected since the legislature has adjourned its regular session.

TEXAS: In March, the House approved a measure that would require an abortion provider or a certified technician to perform an ultrasound 24–72 hours prior to an abortion. The provider would be required to display and describe the ultrasound image to the woman, although the woman would be permitted to avert her eyes from the image. The measure would also require that a woman seeking an abortion receive in-person counseling at least 24 hours prior to the procedure. The bill, which also amends the state’s abortion counseling and waiting period requirement, is awaiting action in the Senate.

TEXAS: In February, the Senate approved a measure that would require a woman seeking an abortion to undergo an ultrasound and be given the opportunity to view the image and hear a description of it. The measure, which would allow survivors of sexual assault and incest, as well as those ending their pregnancy because of an irreversible fetal abnormality, to opt out of the ultrasound, is awaiting action in the House.

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ADOLESCENTS

Minors Access to Reproductive Healthcare

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 8 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in SC

Enacted in UT

SOUTH CAROLINA: In March, the legislature passed two identical measures that would remove the requirement that the Department of Health and Environmental Control notify the superintendent or nurse of a school when a student tests positive for HIV or is diagnosed with AIDS. The bills are awaiting action in their opposite chambers.

(ENACTED) UTAH: In March, Gov. Gary Herbert (R) signed into law a measure that allows a minor who is married, emancipated, a parent or pregnant to consent to immunizations against communicable diseases. However, parental consent is required for most minors requesting the HPV vaccine. The bill also stipulates that the physician will not be required to provide immunizations to the minor. The law goes into effect in May.

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Sex Education

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 27 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in HI, MT and ND

Enacted in MS and VA

HAWAII: In March, the Senate adopted a measure that would require sex education to be provided in all public schools. The instruction would include discussion of healthy relationships, decision-making skills and communication with parents about sex and could not be biased against any race, sex, religion, sexual orientation or gender identity. The state currently requires that when provided, sex education must be medically accurate and include information on contraception and abstinence. The bill is awaiting action in the House.

(ENACTED) MISSISSIPPI: In March, Gov. Haley Barbour (R) signed a measure that requires school districts to provide, at a minimum, abstinence-only education. Additional subjects, such as contraception, may be provided upon approval from the state. Although current law does not require every school to provide sex education, it mandates that any sex education provided in a school teach that sex is only appropriate within marriage and include the “likely negative psychological and physical effects of not abstaining.” The bill, which passed the House in February and the Senate in March, goes into effect in July.

MONTANA: In February, the House adopted a measure that would require parental consent before sex education is provided. The school would also be required to notify parents that sex education will be taught and inform them about the content of the instruction. The bill also prohibits the use of materials or instruction from organizations that are affiliated with abortion services. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

NORTH DAKOTA: In March, the Senate adopted a measure that would require all schools to include abstinence education as part of the health education curriculum. Currently, the state has no policy requiring sex education. The bill, which passed the House in February, is now in a conference committee.

(ENACTED) VIRGINIA: In March, Gov. Bob McDonnell (D) signed a measure that includes the topics of dating violence and abusive relationships in family life education. The bill, which passed the legislature in February, goes into effect in July.

VIRGINIA: In February, a House committee defeated a bill that would have mandated that schools provide sex education. The education would have been required to have the goals of reducing teen pregnancy and STI incidence and be medically accurate and age appropriate. The bill passed the Senate in February.

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Statutory Rape Reporting

Introduced in 6 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in KS and MS

KANSAS: In March, the Senate adopted an omnibus abortion measure that would classify employees or volunteers of organizations that provide services to pregnant teenagers as mandated reporters of child abuse. This provision, as well as provisions on postviability abortion, parental consent and counseling, “partial-birth” abortion and reporting requirements for abortions and minors’ judicial waivers, are included in the final version of the bill that is now awaiting action by Gov. Sam Brownback (R). (The measure was enacted in April.)

MISSISSIPPI: In January, the Senate passed a measure that would include reproductive health clinic staff and volunteers among those individuals who are charged with reporting sexual abuse of a child. The measure would also require a physician performing an abortion on a minor younger than 14 to provide a tissue sample to the state bureau of investigation. The bill, which would also criminalize assisting a minor seeking an abortion without parental consent, is awaiting action in the House.

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CONTRACEPTION & PREVENTION

Abortion-Related Restrictions on State and Family Planning Funds

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 9 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in CO and NH

COLORADO: In March, the legislature passed a supplemental budget bill that continues a longstanding prohibition of giving state family planning funds to organizations that provide abortion services with their own funds. The bill is awaiting action from Gov. John Hickenlooper (D).

NEW HAMPSHIRE: In March, the House adopted the state’s budget which includes a provision that prohibits the use of state family planning funds for the “evaluation, assessment, consultation about, preparation for, or provision of an abortion.” The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Definitions of Contraception

Introduced in 1 state

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Emergency Contraception

Allowing Pharmacists to Provide Emergency Contraception without a Prescription

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 0 states

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Emergency Contraception Services for Sexual Assault Victims

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 6 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in HI

HAWAII: In March, the House passed a measure requiring that a woman who has been sexually assaulted receive medically accurate and unbiased information on emergency contraception, as well as the medication upon request from the hospital treating her injuries. The hospital is not required to provide the medication if the woman has a positive pregnancy test. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

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Restricting Access to Emergency Contraception

Introduced in 0 states

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Insurance Coverage

Contraceptive Coverage

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 6 states

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HPV Tests and Vaccine Coverage

Introduced in 2 states

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Medicaid Family Planning Eligibility Expansions

click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 9 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in IA and MD

IOWA: In March, the Senate passed a measure that would extend the state’s Medicaid family planning expansion to include men. Currently, the program covers women who have an income of up to 200% of the federal poverty level. The bill is awaiting action in the House.

MARYLAND: In March, the House passed a measure that would expand the state’s Medicaid family planning expansion program. Women would be eligible for services if their income is 200% or less of the federal poverty line. Currently, women are covered by the program for five years after the birth of a child. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate. 

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Parental Involvement Requirements for Minors Seeking Contraceptive Services

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 1 state

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Partner Treatment for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Introduced in 1 state

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Pharmacy or Pharmacist Requirements to Dispense Contraception

Introduced in 6 states

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PREGNANCY & BIRTH

Fetal and Pregnant Woman Assault

Introduced in 18 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in MT, NM and NC

MONTANA: In March, the Senate passed a bill that would consider a fetus as a victim of homicide. The bill would include exceptions for abortion, medical care and any act by the woman. The bill is awaiting concurrence in the House.

NEW MEXICO: In March, the House passed a measure that would consider a fetus as a victim of homicide and assault. The bill includes exceptions for abortion, medical care, actions by the woman and actions performed in self-defense. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

NORTH CAROLINA: In March, the House passed a measure that would consider a fetus as a victim of homicide and assault. The bill includes exceptions for legal abortion, medical care and actions by the woman. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

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HIV Testing of Infants and Pregnant Women

Introduced in 6 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in OK

OKLAHOMA: In March, the House passed a measure that would require a health care provider to test a woman for HIV when she delivers an infant if she has not received any prenatal care. The woman would not be permitted to decline the test, even if she knows her HIV status. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate. 

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Infant Abandonment

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 7 states

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Infertility Coverage

Introduced in 10 states

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Non-Medical Use of Ultrasound

Introduced in 1 state

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Stillbirth Certificates

Introduced in 7 states

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Substance Abuse During Pregnancy

Click here for current status of state policy

Introduced in 14 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in AL, AR and NM

Enacted in CO and KY

Vetoed in NM

ALABAMA: In March, the House passed a measure that would consider the act of exposing a fetus to controlled substances or chemicals a felony. The bill is awaiting action in the Senate.

ARKANSAS: In March, the legislature passed a measure that would require a health care provider to report the birth of an infant with fetal alcohol syndrome to the state. The bill is awaiting action from Gov. Mike Beebe (D). (The bill was signed in early April.)

(ENACTED) COLORADO: In March, Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) signed into law a measure that allocates $2 million for drug treatment for pregnant women. The law, which passed the Senate in February and the House in March, is in effect.

(ENACTED) KENTUCKY: In March, Gov. Steve Beshear (D) signed into law a measure that allocates $1.8 million over two years for substance abuse prevention and treatment for pregnant women. The bill passed the legislature in March.

NEW MEXICO: In March, Gov. Susana Martinez (R) vetoeda measure that would have included drug screening as part of routine prenatal and postpartum care, unless the woman declined. The measure would have required the woman to be counseled about the testing and referred to treatment programs if she tested positive. The bill passed the legislature in March.

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REFUSAL CLAUSES

Abortion Services

Click here for current status of state policy

Health Professionals

Introduced in 6 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in KY

Enacted in UT

KENTUCKY: In February, the Senate adopted a measure that would expand the state’s refusal clause to allow any person, employer or health care provider to refuse to be directly or indirectly involved with abortion services. Currently, hospitals and some health care providers may refuse to participate in abortion. No further action is expected since the legislature has adjourned its regular session.

(ENACTED) UTAH: In March, Gov. Gary Herbert (R) signed a measure that expands the state’s abortion refusal clause to allow employees of health care facilities and public and non-religious hospitals to refuse to participate in or perform abortions. Current state law allows hospital employees and private and religious hospitals to refuse to participate in abortion because of religious or moral objections. The bill, which passed the House and Senate in March, will go into effect in May.

 

Allowing Insurers to Refuse

Introduced in 4 states

 

Allowing Pharmacists or Pharmacies to Refuse

Introduced in 5 states

 

Allowing Facilities to Refuse

Introduced in 5 states

Bill Status:

Enacted in UT

(ENACTED) UTAH: In March, Gov. Gary Herbert (R) signed a measure that expands the state’s abortion refusal clause to allow employees of health care facilities and public and non-religious hospitals to refuse to participate in or perform abortions. Current state law allows hospital employees and private and religious hospitals to refuse to participate in abortion because of religious or moral objections. The bill, which passed the House and Senate in March, will go into effect in May.

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Contraceptive Services

Click here for current status of state policy

Health Professionals

Introduced in 4 states

 

Allowing Insurers to Refuse

Introduced in 3 states

 

Allowing Pharmacies or Pharmacists to Refuse

Introduced in 5 states

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General Medical Care

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Health Professionals

Introduced in 3 states

 

Insurers

Introduced in 4 states

 

Pharmacists or Pharmacies

Introduced in 3 states

 

Facilities

Introduced in 3 states

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REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS

Bisphenol-A (BPA)

Introduced in 24 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in IA and MD

IOWA: In March, the Senate adopted a measure that would ban the use of Bisphenol-A (BPA) in pacifiers and reusable beverage containers designed for children aged three and younger. The measure is awaiting action in the House.

MARYLAND: In March, the legislature adopted a measure that would ban the use of BPA in reusable beverage and food containers designed for children younger than four. The bill would also virtually ban BPA from infant formula. The measure is awaiting action by Gov. Martin O’Malley (D).

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Dioxin

Introduced in 1 state

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Flame Retardants

Introduced in 8 states

Bill Status:

Passed at least one chamber in MD

MARYLAND: In March, the House adopted a measure that would sharply curtail use of a widely used flame retardant (decabrominated diphenyl ether or decaDBE) in products manufactured, leased, sold or distributed in the state. The ban would be fully in place by 2014. The bill, which passed the Senate in February, is awaiting action by Gov. Martin O’Malley (D).

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Lead

Introduced in 14 states

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Mercury

Introduced in 22 states

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Parabens

Introduced in 0 states

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Pesticides

Introduced in 6 states

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Phthalates

Introduced in 4 states

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