Protéger la prochaine génération en Afrique subsaharienne

Author(s)

Laura Hessburg
, ,
Akinrinola Bankole
and
Leila Darabi

Répondre aux besoins de santé sexuelle et de la procréation des adolescents d’Afrique subsaharienne est vital étant donné l’impact dévastateur du sida, les taux élevés de grossesses non désirées et le risque que ces grossesses conduisent à des avortements à risque. Protéger la santé des adolescents est clairement identifié comme important par les adolescents eux-mêmes. Par ailleurs, cela constitue une priorité de santé publique. Augmenter les investissements dans la santé sexuelle et de la procréation des adolescents peut contribuer à l’atteinte d’objectifs de développement plus larges en permettant aux adolescents d’être en bonne santé et de devenir des adultes productifs.Ce rapport présente des résultats clefs tirés d’enquêtes représentatives au niveau national, conduites en 2004 auprès des adolescents de 12 à 19 ans dans quatre pays africains : Burkina Faso, Ghana, Malawi et Ouganda. L’objectif est d’enrichir les politiques, programmes et investissements visant l’amélioration de la santé sexuelle et de la procréation des adolescents.

The time is now. Will you stand up for reproductive health and rights?

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Guttmacher Institute, 2006, No. 21.
8. Munthali AC et al., Adolescent sexual and reproductive
health in Malawi: results from the 2004 National Survey
of Adolescents, Occasional Report, New York: Guttmacher
Institute, 2006, No. 24.
9. Neema S et al., Adolescent sexual and reproductive
health in Uganda: results from the 2004 National Survey
of Adolescents, Occasional Report, New York: Guttmacher
Institute, 2006, No. 25.
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