Next Steps for America's Family Planning Program: Leveraging the Potential of Medicaid and Title X in an Evolving Health Care System

Author(s)

Rachel Benson Gold
,
Adam Sonfield
, and
Cory L. Richards
The time is now. Will you stand up for reproductive health and rights?

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Sonfield A, The impact of anti-immigrant policy on publicly subsidized reproductive health care, Guttmacher Policy Review, 2007, 10(1):7–11. CHAPTER 1 Box: Terms Used in this Report 1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Annual update of the HHS poverty guidelines, Federal Register, 2008, 73(15):3971–3972. CHAPTER 2 Box: Meeting Men’s Reproductive Health Needs 1. Kalmuss D and Tatum C, Patterns of men’s use of sexual and reproductive health services, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2007, 39(2):74–81. 2. Frost JJ, Trends in US women’s use of sexual and reproductive health care services, 1995–2002, American Journal of Public Health, 2008, 98(10):1814–1817. 3. Finer LB, Darroch JE and Frost JJ, Services for men at publicly funded family planning agencies, 1998–1999, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2003, 35(5):202–207. 4. 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CHAPTER 4 Box: Models for Expediting Clients’ Contraceptive Care 1. Barot S, Making the case for a ‘contraceptive convenience’ agenda, Guttmacher Policy Review, 2008, 11(4): 11–16. 2. Landry DJ, Wei J and Frost JJ, Public and private providers’ involvement in improving their patients’ contraceptive use, Contraception, 2008, 78(1):42–51. 3. Office of Population Affairs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Program Guidelines for Project Grants for Family Planning Services, 2001, Part II, sec. 8.3, <http://www.hhs.gov/opa/familyplanning/ toolsdocs/2001_ofp_guidelines.pdf>, accessed Oct. 31, 2008. 4. Lindberg L et al., The provision and funding of contraceptive services at publicly funded family planning agencies: 1995–2003, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2006, 38(1):37–45. 5. Planned Parenthood of Western Washington, Online health center, 2008,<http://www.plannedparenthood. org/westernwashington/online-health-center-22020. htm>, accessed Sept. 27, 2008